Cretan Calendar Disks

I have interpreted two objects from Phaistos (Faistos), both in the Heraklion Museum. Both would work well as calendar objects.

One would allow the prediction of eclipses:

The other for tracking eclipse seasons using the 16/15 relationship of the synod of Saturn (Chronos) and the Lunar Year:

paper: Lunar Simulation at Le Manio

Our survey at Le Manio revealed a coherent arc of radial stones, at least five of which were equally long, equally separated and set to a radius of curvature that suggested a common centre. It appears the astronomers at Le Manio understood that, following three lunar sidereal orbits (after 82 days) the moon would appear again at the same point on the ecliptic at the same time of day

paper: The Origins of Day-Inch Counting

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the theory that in the Megalithic period, around 4500-4000 BCE, astronomical time periods were counted as one day to one inch to form primitive metrological lengths that could then be compared, to reveal the fundamental ratios between the solar year, lunar year, and lunar month and hence define a solar-lunar calendar. The means for comparison used was to place lengths as the longer sides of right angled triangles, leading to a unique slope angle. Our March 2010 survey of Le Manio supports this theory.

Le Menec: Start of Carnac’s Alignments

The Meaning Of Le Menec

“Alignments” are long rows of stones, that run in parallel for long distances through the landscape. The alignments in Carnac, Brittany, often have a starting point in what the French call a cromlech. Based upon a circular geometry, these monuments are made up of stones following arcs to form a single compound shape. The stones of a cromlech can be touching or they can be spaced out and in some cases, stones might have been removed during the historical period but in some cases also, gaps in the “walls” of a cromlech were probably intentional and are there on purpose.
Originally published July 2012

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