Recalibrating the Pyramid of Giza

Once the actual height (480 feet) and actual southern base length (756 feet) are multiplied, the length of the 11th degree of latitude (Ethiopia) emerges, in English feet, as 362880 feet. However, in the numeracy of the 3rd millennium BC, a regular number would be used. In the last post, it was noted that John Neal’s discovery of such rectangular numbers to define degrees of latitude, multiplied the pyramid’s pointed height (481.09 feet) by the southern base length (756 feet) to achieve the length of the Nile Delta degree of latitude and, repeating Neal’s diagram relating the key latitudinal degrees of the ancient Model as figure 1, the Ethiopian degree is 440/441 of the Nile Delta degree. As shown above, the length of the 756 foot southern base is changed, when re-measured in the latitudinal feet for Ethiopia; it becomes the harmonic limit of 720 feet of 1.05 feet – normally called the root Persian foot.

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Ethiopia within the Great Pyramid

My last posting mentioned John Neal’s creative step of not averaging the Great Pyramid of Giza’s four sides, as had routinely been done in the past – as if to discover an idealized design with four equal sides. Instead, Neal found each length to have intensionally been different. When multiplied by the pyramid’s full height, the length of four different degrees of latitude were each encoded as an area. The length of the southern side is integer as 756 feet, and this referred to the longest latitude, that of the Nile Delta, below 31.5 degrees North. Here we find that the pyramid’s reduced height also indicated the latitude of Ethiopia.

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Lesson 2: Maintaining integers using fractions

understanding the megalithic: circular structures: part 2

The megalithic sought integer lengths because they lacked the arithmetic of later millennia. So how did they deal with numbers? There is plenty of evidence in their early monuments that today’s inch and foot already existed and these and other measures used to count days or months; from this, numbers came to be known by their length in inches and later on as feet, and longer lengths like a fathom of five feet, the cubit of 3/2 feet and, larger still, furlongs and miles – to name only a few.

So megalithic numeracy was primarily associated with lengths, a system we call metrology. Having metrology but not arithmetic, the integer solutions to problems became a necessity. Incidentally, it was because of their metrological numeracy that the megalithic chanced upon a rich seam of astronomical meaning within the geocentric time world that surrounds us, a seam well-nigh invisible to modern science. Their storing of numbers as lengths also led to their application to the properties geometrical structures have, to replicate what arithmetic and trigonometry do, by using right triangles and a system of fractional measures of a foot (see later lesson – to come). In what follows, for both simplicity and veracity, we assume that π was too abstract for the megalithic, since they first used radius ropes to create circles, so that 2π was a more likely entity for them to have resolved.

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Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle
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A Brief Introduction to Ancient Metrology (2006)

appended to
Sacred Number and the Origin of Civilisation

There used to be an interest in metrology – the Ancient Science of Measures – especially when studying ancient monuments. However the information revealed from sites often became mixed with the religious ideas of the researcher leading to coding systems such as those of Pyramidology and Gematria. The general effect has been that metrology, outside of modern engineering uses, has been left unconsidered by modern scientific archaeology.

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Silbury Hill: Metrological Key to the Model of the Earth between Stonehenge & Avebury

Archived: 11 August 2012

The exact location of Silbury Hill is as mysterious as the purpose of the Hill itself, a thirty degree cone, only recently with a flat top, overlooking Avebury and the surrounding hills. The Hill figures in John Michell’s model of the Earth between Stonehenge and Avebury in which one quarter of a degree of latitude, between the two henges, appears to have been measured by a type of Persian foot so as to make the number of feet, in between, equal numerically to that required to perfectly model the Earth using 864:866:867 double triangle.

The double triangle model of the size of the Earth between Stonehenge and Avebury

There are 86400 Persian feet of 1.056 feet (south to north) between Stonehenge and Avebury Ridgeway enabling the Avebury henge to be 86600 of these Persian feet from Stonehenge, then to represent the Mean Earth radius (see Initial Article – missing link). The Avebury henge appears to have been specifically tied to the distinct Latitude of 360/7 degrees.

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