Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle

This geometry, first found by John Michell [1933-2009], and by others after that, within the monuments and artifacts of the megalithic, ancient and medieval worlds: notably Stonehenge where the mean diameter of the Sarsen Lintel ring is 14 units while the concentric bluestone circle appears to have had a diameter 11 of the same units. One of a handful of known models known to the ancient world, this work continues on from my forthcoming book, Sacred Geometry: Language of the Angels.

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