Geodetic properties of the Great Pyramid

A useful set of links to 4 recent posts about the Great Pyramids recording the length of different latitudes in the northern hemisphere. Further commentary will soon be forthcoming to better integrate these posts.

  1. Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza
  2. Ethiopia within the Great Pyramid
  3. Recalibrating the Pyramid of Giza
  4. A Pyramidion for the Great Pyramid

A Pyramidion for the Great Pyramid

image: By 1200 BC, the end of the Bronze Age, the Egyptian map of the world (above) showed nine bows or latitudes, numbers 4 to 9 including the Nile Delta, Delphi, Southern Britain and Iceland, a map based on an ancient geodetic survey.

This post explores a pyramidion, now lost, which exceeded the apex height of the pyramid, so as to model the different reference latitudes established by geodetic surveys and encoded within their metrology and the Great Pyramid (by 2500 BC). This pyramidion would have sat on the flat top of the pyramid, 480 feet above the base of the pyramid.

In All Done With Mirrors, John Neal described how the full height of the pyramid, reaching to its natural apex, would have been just over 481 feet. Most pyramids probably had a pyramidion since a number have been found elsewhere that repeat aspects of or have a name carved on them, of a specific pyramid. Sitting on their apex, they often repeat the form of the larger pyramid, and are scale models of a specific pyramid. In the case of the Great Pyramid, exactly 441th of its natural apex is missing, and this is likely to be because a pyramidion once stood on the flat top the actual pyramid.

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Recalibrating the Pyramid of Giza

Once the actual height (480 feet) and actual southern base length (756 feet) are multiplied, the length of the 11th degree of latitude (Ethiopia) emerges, in English feet, as 362880 feet. However, in the numeracy of the 3rd millennium BC, a regular number would be used. In the last post, it was noted that John Neal’s discovery of such rectangular numbers to define degrees of latitude, multiplied the pyramid’s pointed height (481.09 feet) by the southern base length (756 feet) to achieve the length of the Nile Delta degree of latitude and, repeating Neal’s diagram relating the key latitudinal degrees of the ancient Model as figure 1, the Ethiopian degree is 440/441 of the Nile Delta degree. As shown above, the length of the 756 foot southern base is changed, when re-measured in the latitudinal feet for Ethiopia; it becomes the harmonic limit of 720 feet of 1.05 feet – normally called the root Persian foot.

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Ethiopia within the Great Pyramid

My last posting mentioned John Neal’s creative step of not averaging the Great Pyramid of Giza’s four sides, as had routinely been done in the past – as if to discover an idealized design with four equal sides. Instead, Neal found each length to have intensionally been different. When multiplied by the pyramid’s full height, the length of four different degrees of latitude were each encoded as an area. The length of the southern side is integer as 756 feet, and this referred to the longest latitude, that of the Nile Delta, below 31.5 degrees North. Here we find that the pyramid’s reduced height also indicated the latitude of Ethiopia.

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Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle
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