The Harmonic Origins of the World

“We have long known, thanks to Ernest McClain, that the ancients were obsessed with harmonic numbers and that the Bible encodes these from beginning to end. Now new evidence appears, as these numbers correlate with the planetary periods, and their discovery is pushed far back into the prehistoric era. Richard Heath’s work, based not on speculation but on objective data, challenges all accepted notions of cultural evolution and religious origins.”

–JOSCELYN GODWIN, author of Harmonies of Heaven and Earth and Atlantis and the Cycles of Time

As modern humans first walked the Earth roughly 70,000 years ago, the moon’s orbit came into harmonic resonance with the outer planets of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The common denominators underlying these harmonic relationships are the earliest prime numbers of the Fibonacci series–two, three, and five–the same numbers that interact to give us the harmonic relationships of music.

Continue reading “The Harmonic Origins of the World”

St Pierre 1: Jupiter and the Moon

The egg-shaped stone circles of the megalithic, in Brittany by c. 4000 BC and in Britain by 2500 BC, seem to express two different astronomical time lengths, beside each other as (a) a circumference and then (b) a longer, egg-shaped extension of that circle. It was Alexander Thom who analysed stone circles in the 20th century as a hobby, surveying most of the surviving stone circles in Britain and finding geometrical patterns within irregular circles. He speculated the egg-shaped and flattened circles were manipulating pi so as to equal three (not 3.1416) between an initial radius and subsequent perimeter, so making them commensurate in integer units. For example, the irregular circle would have perimeter 12 and a radius of 4 (a flattened circle).

However, when the forming circle and perimeter are compared, these can compare the two lengths of a right-triangle while adding a recurring nature: where the end is a new beginning. Each cycle is a new beginning because the whole geocentric sky is rotational and the planetary system orbital. The counting of time periods was more than symbolic since the two astronomical time periods became, by artifice, related to one another as two integer perimeters that is, commensurate to one another, as is seen at St Pierre (fig.3).

Continue reading “St Pierre 1: Jupiter and the Moon”

Further Ratios of the Outer Planets to the Lunar Year

The traditional way to express the Harmony of the Spheres is geometrically, despite the fact that geometrical knowledge of the heliocentric planetary system was not available to Pythagoras who, for the West, first established this whole idea – that the planets were part of a system expressing harmony.

The opening picture is from Kepler’s Harmonices Mundi :
from a scan made of the Smithsonian’s copy,
made available on Wikipedia as in the public domain.

In my own work, on the type of ancient astronomy based upon time and not space, I find it to be the outer planets in particular which express harmony in their geocentric synods relative to the lunar year. This applies to Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus but Neptune expresses a rational fraction of 28/27 involving prime numbers {2 3 7} whilst the other three planets only involve ratios involving primes {2 3 5}. The harmony of the outer planets has been a strong source for the sacred numbers found in ancient texts, as with Jupiter 1080 – considered a lunar number perhaps because the Moon is resonant to Jupiter – who is shown by figure 1 to be geocentrically resonant to the other planets and the Moon.

Continue reading “Further Ratios of the Outer Planets to the Lunar Year”