Extremely Ancient knowledge of Precession of the Equinoxes

The above is part of the title of an 2018 paper  on the Athens Journal of History website, by Martin B. Sweatman and Alistair Coombs currently available here: 

Decoding European Palaeolithic Art: Extremely Ancient knowledge of Precession of the Equinoxes

This work concerns our understanding of the astronomical knowledge of ancient people. This knowledge, it seems, enabled them to record dates, using animal symbols to represent star constellations, in terms of precession of the equinoxes. Conventionally, Hipparchus of Ancient Greece is credited with discovering this astronomical phenomenon. We show here that this level of astronomical sophistication was known already within the last ice- age, and very likely by the time Homo sapiens entered western Europe around 40,000 years ago.

They go on to say “The evidence used to verify our hypothesis is accumulated from many of the most famous Palaeolithic cave art sites across Europe, representing dates up to 38,000 BC including;• Hohlenstein-Stadel cave, southern Germany circa 38,000 BC• Chauvet, northern Spain circa 33,000 BC• Lascaux, southern France circa 15,000 BC• Altamira, northern Spain circa 15,000 BC. Moreover, this system of representing dates is fully consistent with our interpretation of Neolithic sites in Anatolia, namely;• Göbekli Tepe, southern Turkey circa 10,000 BC• Çatalhöyük, southern Turkey circa 7,000 BC”

The question of ancient origins and precession was brought up well by de Santillana and von Deschend in Hamlet’s Mill (1969) and in Tilak’s The Orion (1893,) based largely upon mythic texts. A number of authors have previously found for star maps in stone age art, but this work appears to have crossed some scientific Rubicon and may find itself in Rome. There is a direct descendent of Hamlet’s Mill in The Spiritual Science of the Stars by Peter Stewart (who wrote it after decades of follow-up to that book).

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Metrology of Chartres Labyrinth

first published on my Square Space blog on November 26, 2006

The picture below is a composite of three things

  1. The Chartres eleven level labyrinth discussed in chapter seven.
  2. The iconography of Thoth as Pi within the circle (from Temple of Man).
  3. The hexagonal number 19 as circles
Figure 1 Geometry of Thoth and 19 packed circles overlaid the Labyrinth

The 22 units of the 21 unit sector of Thoth’s fathom correspond to 19 “cogs” of the circumference of the Chartre labyrinth.

It is fabulous that the cogs are used to define, by their centres, the perimeter as the unit called ped manualis by the buildersaccording to John James (the foremost investigator of that cathedral’s construction order – see his website).

Whilst the ped manualis is a Royal Foot, 8/7, in Neal’s Standard Geographical variation (times 126/125 and times 176/175), it is also close to 22/19 feet (different by 8 thousandths of an inch and 99.94% accurate). Thus whilst 19 cogs equal 22 units, the cogs are 22/19 which times 19 is 22 feet – plus 19 is a hexagonal number and there is the motif of six petals in the centre.

The entire circumference is, like the iconography of Thoth, 6 x 22 = 132 feet long. Using Pi at 22/7, the 22s cancel and the result is a diameter of 6 x 7 or 42 English feet. Like the Scottish brochs, the units directly interpret the ideal value of Pi itself as 22/7, employing as it does the prime numbers 11/7 that also define "Ancient Model of the World".

The Cult of Seven Days

Published in Nexus Magazine in 2004

When understanding the origins of human knowledge, we tend not to look into the everyday aspects of life such as the calendar, our numbering systems and how these could have developed. However, these components of everyday life hold surprising clues to the past.

An example is the seven day week which we all slavishly follow today. It has been said that seven makes a good number of days for a week and this convenience argument often given for the existence of weeks.

Having a week allows one to know what day of the week it is for the purposes of markets and religious observances. It is an informal method of counting based on names rather than numbers. Beyond this however, a useful week length should fit well with the organisation of the year (i.e. the Sun), or the month (i.e. the Moon) or other significant celestial or seasonal cycle. But the seven day week does not fit in with the Sun and the Moon.

The Week and the Year

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