paper: The Origins of Day-Inch Counting

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the theory that in the Megalithic period, around 4500-4000 BCE, astronomical time periods were counted as one day to one inch to form primitive metrological lengths that could then be compared, to reveal the fundamental ratios between the solar year, lunar year, and lunar month and hence define a solar-lunar calendar. The means for comparison used was to place lengths as the longer sides of right angled triangles, leading to a unique slope angle. Our March 2010 survey of Le Manio supports this theory.

Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle

This geometry, first found by John Michell [1933-2009], and by others after that, within the monuments and artifacts of the megalithic, ancient and medieval worlds: notably Stonehenge where the mean diameter of the Sarsen Lintel ring is 14 units while the concentric bluestone circle appears to have had a diameter 11 of the same units. One of a handful of known models known to the ancient world, this work continues on from my forthcoming book, Sacred Geometry: Language of the Angels.

Continue reading “Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza”

Sacred Geometry: Language of the Angels

Pages: 288
Book Size: 8 x 10
ISBN-13: 9781644111185
Imprint: Inner Traditions
On Sale Date: January 5, 2021
Format: Hardcover Book
Illustrations: Full-color throughout

For further details of the book look at the growing Publisher pages for it at Inner Traditions.