Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization

Published by Inner Traditions

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ANCIENT MYSTERIES / NEW SCIENCE

“Richard Heath sweeps away the mechanistic and relativistic paradigm to reveal an earth-centered, celestial system founded upon the beauty of musical harmony and geometric symmetry.”
–Robert Lawlor, author of Sacred Geometry and Voices of the First Day

“Richard Heath effectively rewrites the book on the mysterious but accomplished megalithic cultures preceding ancient Egypt, Sumer, China, and India.”
–John Anthony West, author of Serpent in the Sky: The High Wisdom of Ancient Egypt

“. . . well-expressed, with a deep insight into the ancient science.”
–John Michell, author of The Dimensions of Paradise

The ubiquitous use of certain sacred numbers and ratios can be found throughout history, influencing everything from art and architecture to the development of religion and secret societies. In Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization, Richard Heath reveals the origins, widespread influences, and deeper meaning of these synchronous numerical occurrences and how they were left within our planetary environment during the creation of the earth, the moon, and our solar system.

Exploring astronomy, harmony, geomancy, sacred centers, and myth, Heath reveals the secret use of sacred number knowledge in the building of Gothic cathedrals and the important influence of sacred numbers in the founding of modern Western culture. He explains how the Templar design of Washington, D.C., represents the New Jerusalem, and he identifies the role secret societies play as a repository for sacred numerical information. Those who attempt to decode its meaning without understanding the planetary origins of this knowledge are left with contradictory, cryptic, and often deceptive information. By examining prehistoric and monumental cultures through the Dark Ages and later recorded history, Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization provides a key to understanding the true role and meaning of number.

Richard Heath is a Web developer with degrees in electrical and computer engineering. The author of The Matrix of Creation: Sacred Geometry in the Realm of the Planets, he lives in Scotland.

Sacred Geometry: Language of the Angels

Examining the angelic science of number, Richard Heath reveals how the development of human consciousness was no accident. The beauty and elegance we see in sacred geometry and in structures built according to those proportions are the language of the angels still speaking to us.

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Reveals how the number science found in ancient sacred monuments reflects wisdom transmitted from the angelic orders

• Explains how the angels transmitted megalithic science to early humans to further our conscious development

• Decodes the angelic science hidden in a wide range of monuments, including Carnac in Brittany, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, early Christian pavements, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Stonehenge in England, and the Kaaba in Mecca

• Explores how the number science behind ancient monuments gave rise to religions and spiritual practices

The angelic mind is founded on a deep understanding of number and the patterns they produce. These patterns provided a constructive framework for all manifested life on Earth. The beauty and elegance we see in sacred geometry and in structures built according to those proportions are the language of the angels still speaking to us.

Examining the angelic science of number first manifested on Earth in the Stone Age, Richard Heath reveals how the resulting development of human consciousness was no accident: just as the angels helped create the Earth’s environment, humans were then evolved to make the planet self-aware. To develop human minds, the angels transmitted their own wisdom to humanity through a numerical astronomy that counted planetary and lunar time periods. Heath explores how this early humanity developed an expert understanding of sacred number through astronomical geometries, leading to the unified range of measures employed in their observatories and later in cosmological monuments such as the Giza Pyramids and Stonehenge. The ancient Near East transformed megalithic science into our own mathematics of notational arithmetic and trigonometry, further developing the human mind within the early civilizations.

Heath decodes the angelic science hidden within a wide range of monuments and sites, including Carnac in Brittany, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, Teotihuacan in Mexico, early Christian pavements, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and the Kaaba in Mecca. Exploring the techniques used to design these monuments, he explains how the number science behind them gave rise to ancient religions and spiritual practices. He also explores the importance of lunar astronomy, first in defining a world suitable for life and then in providing a subject accessible to pre-arithmetic humans, for whom the Moon was a constant companion.

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Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle
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Use of Ad-Quadratum at Angkor Wat

The large temple complex of Angkor Wat ( photo: Chris Junker at flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 )

Ad Quadratum is a convenient and profound technique in which continuous scaling of size can be given to square shapes, either from a centre or periphery. The differences in scale are multiples of the square root
of two [sqrt(2)] between two types of square: cardinal (flat) and diamond (pointed).

The diagonal of a square of unit size is sqrt(2), When a square is nested to just touch a larger square’s opposite sides, one can know the squares differ by sqrt(2)
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Iceland’s Model of the Earth’s Meridian

Einar Palsson [1, at end] saw that the myths of foundation for Iceland’s settlement in 930 had Pythagorean roots. Since then Petur Halldorsson has identified patterns that could not have been influenced by Pythagoras (c. 600 BC) and Pythagoras was known to have adapted the existing number sciences found (according to his myth) from Egypt to China.

Such patterns, called Cosmic Images by Halldorsson [3], seek to establish a geometric connection between places on the landscape and on the horizon, here in the south-western region near Reykjavik, the only Icelandic city. The spirit of a region or island was integrated through organising space in this way, according to centers (Things) of circles and their radius and diameter as numbers of paces, circles punctuated with places and alignments to other places, horizon events or cardinal directions. John Michell provided a guide to some of the techniques in his books [2, at end].


Figure 1 The Cosmic Image east of Reykjavik proposed by Palsson
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John Michell’s Perpetual Choirs

15 April 2017 Views: 10450

In 1972  John Michell inferred an enormous ten-sided form nearly sixty three miles across, in which important historical and neolithic sites had been intended as ten vertices around an ancient centre, signified by a Whiteleafed Oak.

Figure 1 The Decagon of Perpetual Choirs, anchored upon Stonehenge, the Solstice sunrise in summer and set in winter

Michell had previously [1991] developed the idea of the enchantment of the land as an actual practice; land areas were enchanted by using a geometrical pattern integrated with myths and ritual calendars, enacted within that framework. This  was long before, around 930, such a pattern was being established of thing-places in Iceland. The idea of thing places is still find-able in English names such as Goring, the centre northeast of Stonehenge, where the summer solstice sun arose.

“Perpetual choirs were a Celtic institution, from pagan into early Christian times. In Iola Morganwg’s Triads of Britain, translated from Welsh, it is stated that ‘in each of these three choirs there were 24,000 saints; that is,
there were a hundred for every hour of the day and the night in rotation, perpetuating the praise and service of God without rest or intermission.’ ”  – The Measure of Albion

“Three of the choirs were located at Stonehenge, at Glastonbury, and near Llantwit Major in Wales. Others appear to have been at Goring-on- Thames and at Croft Hill in Leicestershire, a traditional site of ritual,  legal, and popular assemblies.” The Dimensions of Paradise


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