Before, during and after Sacred Geometry

above: Carreg Coetan Arthur portal dolmen in Newport, Pembrokeshire.

The prehistory of sacred geometry was the late stone age, when the stone circles, dolmens, and long alignments to astronomical events on the horizon, used megaliths (large stones) in geometrical ways. Their geometries served their quest to understand the heavens, without telescopes or arithmetic, by using counted time periods as geometrical lines, squares and circles. Geometry, supplemented by the days counted between alignment events, was therefore a prelude to sacred and then secular geometry.

By developing early geometrical methods, they forged an enduring cultural norm lasting millennia, as part (or not) of the more-familiar aspect of the neolithic, innovating an agricultural pastoralism, that could support settlements, cities and, only then, the great civilizations of the middle and far east. It was civilization that generated our earliest written histories; these still powering our historical context and leading the basic notion of economic progress and territorial expansion, as superior to all that went before.

Our surviving megaliths are hence deeply enigmatic, a mysterious and mute presence in a world far less mysterious. The megaliths may have something we have forgotten in a collective way, something pushed out by millennia of later ideas and now relatively recent ones too.

There seems little trace of the megalithic astronomers themselves, their geometricized landscape overlaid by our notions of a primitive Stone Age.  And, as the prelude to world history, their geometry gave birth to sacred geometry and sacred buildings; pyramids, ziggurats, temples and religious complexes. In some way, therefore, geometry obtained its sacredness from the skies or the earth itself, as if these had been built from the harmonious organization of the solar system seen from Earth and given to it by one or more gods or angels.

Sacred geometry the became a secular and analytical geometry, which would become an encyclopedic exploration of all that geometry could do, rather than a set of techniques dreamt up by a band of roaming astronomers. In our schools, many lose interest in having to learn geometry in the abstract and so, in this, the megalithic had an advantage. They could learn geometry as and when they needed it, as their astronomy brought up new questions to solve, learning by finding methods to answer questions.

If one truly travels backwards in time, to discover what the megalithic astronomers had understood, I believe one has to decide which bits of your own skills have to be applied to solve the riddles of the megalithic mind. Each modern researcher must not assume the megalithic could calculate using numbers, use trigonometry, knew Pythagoras’ theorum, and so on. And yet, one can employ modern equipment to help investigate the megalithic. Google Earth, for example, can allow megalithic alignments to be studied, their azimuth, length and interrelation, whilst the context of sites can be seen that may provide clues not available in site plans, written descriptions and so on, which are sometimes difficult to obtain or require a personal expedition. The most basic tool for me has been the Casio scientific calculators, since the megalithic interaction with space (geometry) was blended with the interaction of numerical time counting, numbers which exist in the geocentric world of time.

Finally, one must realise the past is only in the present through our attention to it and, in the absence of much official interest in applied geometry, dimensionality and astronomical intent of the sites, it is left to non-specialists to become new specialists in the sense of recovering and conserving the true achievements of the megalithic, for our present age, while the monuments still exist as living mysteries. In this I advocate the path leading to what this website is about.

Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization

Published by Inner Traditions

Back Cover

ANCIENT MYSTERIES / NEW SCIENCE

“Richard Heath sweeps away the mechanistic and relativistic paradigm to reveal an earth-centered, celestial system founded upon the beauty of musical harmony and geometric symmetry.”
–Robert Lawlor, author of Sacred Geometry and Voices of the First Day

“Richard Heath effectively rewrites the book on the mysterious but accomplished megalithic cultures preceding ancient Egypt, Sumer, China, and India.”
–John Anthony West, author of Serpent in the Sky: The High Wisdom of Ancient Egypt

“. . . well-expressed, with a deep insight into the ancient science.”
–John Michell, author of The Dimensions of Paradise

The ubiquitous use of certain sacred numbers and ratios can be found throughout history, influencing everything from art and architecture to the development of religion and secret societies. In Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization, Richard Heath reveals the origins, widespread influences, and deeper meaning of these synchronous numerical occurrences and how they were left within our planetary environment during the creation of the earth, the moon, and our solar system.

Exploring astronomy, harmony, geomancy, sacred centers, and myth, Heath reveals the secret use of sacred number knowledge in the building of Gothic cathedrals and the important influence of sacred numbers in the founding of modern Western culture. He explains how the Templar design of Washington, D.C., represents the New Jerusalem, and he identifies the role secret societies play as a repository for sacred numerical information. Those who attempt to decode its meaning without understanding the planetary origins of this knowledge are left with contradictory, cryptic, and often deceptive information. By examining prehistoric and monumental cultures through the Dark Ages and later recorded history, Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization provides a key to understanding the true role and meaning of number.

Richard Heath is a Web developer with degrees in electrical and computer engineering. The author of The Matrix of Creation: Sacred Geometry in the Realm of the Planets, he lives in Scotland.

Sacred Geometry: Language of the Angels

Examining the angelic science of number, Richard Heath reveals how the development of human consciousness was no accident. The beauty and elegance we see in sacred geometry and in structures built according to those proportions are the language of the angels still speaking to us.

Publisher Pages

Description

Reveals how the number science found in ancient sacred monuments reflects wisdom transmitted from the angelic orders

• Explains how the angels transmitted megalithic science to early humans to further our conscious development

• Decodes the angelic science hidden in a wide range of monuments, including Carnac in Brittany, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, early Christian pavements, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Stonehenge in England, and the Kaaba in Mecca

• Explores how the number science behind ancient monuments gave rise to religions and spiritual practices

The angelic mind is founded on a deep understanding of number and the patterns they produce. These patterns provided a constructive framework for all manifested life on Earth. The beauty and elegance we see in sacred geometry and in structures built according to those proportions are the language of the angels still speaking to us.

Examining the angelic science of number first manifested on Earth in the Stone Age, Richard Heath reveals how the resulting development of human consciousness was no accident: just as the angels helped create the Earth’s environment, humans were then evolved to make the planet self-aware. To develop human minds, the angels transmitted their own wisdom to humanity through a numerical astronomy that counted planetary and lunar time periods. Heath explores how this early humanity developed an expert understanding of sacred number through astronomical geometries, leading to the unified range of measures employed in their observatories and later in cosmological monuments such as the Giza Pyramids and Stonehenge. The ancient Near East transformed megalithic science into our own mathematics of notational arithmetic and trigonometry, further developing the human mind within the early civilizations.

Heath decodes the angelic science hidden within a wide range of monuments and sites, including Carnac in Brittany, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, Teotihuacan in Mexico, early Christian pavements, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and the Kaaba in Mecca. Exploring the techniques used to design these monuments, he explains how the number science behind them gave rise to ancient religions and spiritual practices. He also explores the importance of lunar astronomy, first in defining a world suitable for life and then in providing a subject accessible to pre-arithmetic humans, for whom the Moon was a constant companion.

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Units within the Great Pyramid of Giza

There is a great way to express pi of 22/7 using two concentric circles of diameter 11 and 14 (in any units). Normally, a diameter of 7 gives rise to a circumference of 22, when pi is being approximated as 22/7 (3.142587) rather than being the irrational number 3.141592654 … for then, the 14 diameter should have a circumference of 44, which is also the perimeter of the square which encloses a circle of diameter 11.

The square of side 11 and
the circle of diameter 14
will both have the same perimeter.

Figure 1 The Equal Perimeter model of two circles, the smaller of which has an out-square of equal perimeter to the greater circle
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Use of Ad-Quadratum at Angkor Wat

The large temple complex of Angkor Wat ( photo: Chris Junker at flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 )

Ad Quadratum is a convenient and profound technique in which continuous scaling of size can be given to square shapes, either from a centre or periphery. The differences in scale are multiples of the square root
of two [sqrt(2)] between two types of square: cardinal (flat) and diamond (pointed).

The diagonal of a square of unit size is sqrt(2), When a square is nested to just touch a larger square’s opposite sides, one can know the squares differ by sqrt(2)
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Iceland’s Model of the Earth’s Meridian

Einar Palsson [1, at end] saw that the myths of foundation for Iceland’s settlement in 930 had Pythagorean roots. Since then Petur Halldorsson has identified patterns that could not have been influenced by Pythagoras (c. 600 BC) and Pythagoras was known to have adapted the existing number sciences found (according to his myth) from Egypt to China.

Such patterns, called Cosmic Images by Halldorsson [3], seek to establish a geometric connection between places on the landscape and on the horizon, here in the south-western region near Reykjavik, the only Icelandic city. The spirit of a region or island was integrated through organising space in this way, according to centers (Things) of circles and their radius and diameter as numbers of paces, circles punctuated with places and alignments to other places, horizon events or cardinal directions. John Michell provided a guide to some of the techniques in his books [2, at end].


Figure 1 The Cosmic Image east of Reykjavik proposed by Palsson
Continue reading “Iceland’s Model of the Earth’s Meridian”